Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Tertiary Assessment Symposium Revisited

On Thursday 27 November 2008, Hazel Owen and Helen Martin (Centere of Teaching and Learning Innovation) re-presented their Tertiary Assessment Symposium paper - "Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment". The paper represents an extended version of that given in Wellington, with more detail and discussion invited.

Below is the abstract for the paper:
"Assessment practice is at its most rich when assessment events are relevant, authentic and timely.  Relevant assessment is that which is inextricably linked to learning outcomes designed to meet an agreed graduate profile (Biggs, 1999).  Authentic assessment requires students to perform real-world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential skills and knowledge.  Timely assessment provides students with the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge gained as they learn.  Teaching and learning in a blended format enables relevant, authentic and timely assessment that is greatly facilitated by the use of online tools, including self-grading, simulation and problem-based approaches, activities that require reflection and peer-review and the electronic delivery of assessment tasks.  Drawing on Bloom's extended taxonomy of cognitive development (Anderson, Krathwohl & Bloom , 2001) and sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1934) this paper will demonstrate the value of designing and using e-assessments to enhance student learning.  Examples will be explored that illustrate some of the benefits to teaching and learning offered by moving toward assessments based in flexible, mobile, collaborative learning technologies".

Please cite as: Owen, H and Martin, H. (2008, November 27). Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment. Paper presented at The Tertiary Assessment Symposium Revisited: Unitec Lunch Time Series. Unitec: Auckland, NZ.
 


Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Getting the most out of your text books...

This is a video that was developed especially fo the School of Natural Sciences at Unitec New Zealand. It is part of the institutions initiative to help students improve their academic literacy skills, starting from a basic 'finding your way around a book' stance.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008




Well - here I am. In Australia. In Melbourne. It has been a somewhat turbulent journey though and I am now sitting in not so sunny Geelong North....

Prior to my arrival in Australia, I was a little hasty in embracing wholeheartedly (and without reference to a map) the great accommodation Kelly found that was within my budget. As the owner of the motel assured us (and she is very nice) there is indeed a Deakin Uni about 20 mins walk away...just happens to be the Geelong Deakin Uni Satellite campus rather than the one where the conference is actually being held!

When I arrived on Sunday at Melbourne airport I began to be concerned after, having not found a shuttle bus to Geelong I hopped in a taxi which bowled along, and along.... About an hour and a half later and $AU 125.00 poorer, I arrived. Having found a map of Geelong I located the uni (great relief), but then could not find the correct road names - 'bugger' I thought, sulked, had a little tantie, and then set off to see if I could figure out what to do.


So, here I am about 100km away from where I should be, but luckily there is a train into Melbourne (takes about an hour - and it's only about $AU15 return, so it shouldn't blow the budget too much more) and then I'll hop on a tram to Burwood (another hour)...to where the conference is. Oops.

Geelong is rather attractive down by the Bay. It has an esplanade which I have run along several times now, on the first morning during sunrise which was breathtakingly beautiful. Unruffled sea, dyed blue, green and gold.

A flexible model for LMS course design


Recently I have been working with a number of faculty at Unitec NZ to develop courses in the LMSs we have (Moodle and Blackboard). Alongside the adaptation of existing courses and activities, often staff will be at a loss as to what they really want to include in an LMS course.

It was suggested that faculty, alongside considerations of how they will adapt specific activities using the ICTELT model and framework, draw up a mindmap that identifies the main functionality and design of the LMS course they wish to use. However, some faculty found this a challenge, so I have developed the following mindmap 'model'. It is flexible and users of it are encouraged to change it to suit their purposes. You will need to go to the Mindomo site where the map is hosted to view it properly.

Although the central starting point of the mindmap is labelled "course" it could just as easily be a Community of Practice, a department, or a support unit that wishes to improve their communication. Users, therfore, should change or omit any of the elements that are irrelevant to them.

Any feedback that you might have on what I have missed out, or suggestions for improvement would be very much appreciated.

Thursday, November 27, 2008

Learners re-shaping learning landscapes: New directions for old challenges?

In a couple of days I am off to present at the ASCILITE conference in Melbourne, Australia, and am really looking forward to it - should be very interesting. Below is the full version of the paper that I will be presenting, and if you click this link it will take you to a copy of the PowerPoint presentation in Slideshare. I'll give an overview of the conference once I've arrived :-)


Please cite as: Owen, H. (2008). Learners re-shaping learning landscapes: New directions for old challenges? In Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology? Proceedings ascilite Melbourne 2008. http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/melbourne08/procs/owen.pdf

Abstract:
The sheer inevitability and momentum of global adoption of all forms of technology has engendered a range of responses from wholehearted welcome and exploitation, to denial and anger . Consequently, the education landscape has been shifting, although not in the colossal, earth-rending manner that was initially envisaged. Information, Communication Technology Enhanced Learning and Teaching (ICTELT) has progressively continued to evolve and mature, embedded in an increasing foundation of research. One key benefit identified in this process is the inclusiveness and fluidity that can be built into ICTELT experiences, especially when they occur within a collaborative community. This paper explores an example of how ICT was used to adapt part of an existing ‘problematic’ curriculum in a way that helped address central issues, encouraged collective learning and enabled learners. In the Foundations programme at Dubai Men’s College (DMC) students find the conventions of academic writing, and the requirement to improve their proficiency, challenging, especially as they are also struggling with the transition from secondary to tertiary education, and their own changing identities. The framework of existing Communities of Learning (CoL) was employed to introduce a blended, scaffolded approach that aimed to assist students with academic writing, as well as assisting their transition to more self-directed, confident learning. The design and implementation of the interventions is described, and a brief overview of the results of the associated research study is given, along with recommendations for educators wishing to adopt a similar approach.



Owen

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment

This is a link to the audio of the presentation (Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment) that Helen Martin and I gave at the Symposium on Tertiary Assessment and Higher Education at Victoria University, Wellington - 17h - 20th Nov 2008. Click here to follow the link to the PowerPoint on Slideshare.

Abstract: "Assessment practice is at its most rich when assessment events are relevant, authentic and timely. Relevant assessment is that which is inextricably linked to learning outcomes designed to meet an agreed graduate profile (Biggs, 1999). Authentic assessment requires students to perform real-world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential skills and knowledge. Timely assessment provides students with the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge gained as they learn. Teaching and learning in a blended format enables relevant, authentic and timely assessment that is greatly facilitated by the use of online tools, including self-grading, simulation and problem-based approaches, activities that require reflection and peer-review and the electronic delivery of assessment tasks. Drawing on Blooms extended taxonomy of cognitive development (Anderson, Krathwohl, & Bloom, 2001) and sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1934) this paper will demonstrate the value of designing and using e-assessments to enhance student learning. Examples will be explored that illustrate some of the benefits to teaching and learning offered by moving toward assessments based in flexible, mobile, collaborative learning technologies."

Please cite as: Owen, H., & Martin, H. (2008 , November 17-19). Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment. Paper presented at the Symposium on Tertiary Assessment and Higher Education Student Outcomes: Policy, Practice, and Research, Rutherford House, Wellington, New Zealand.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment

This is a link to the presentation (Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment) on Slideshare that Helen Martin and I gave at the Symposium on Tertiary Assessment and Higher Education at Victoria University, Wellington - 17h - 20th Nov 2008. I recorded the session and will podcast it as soon as I have the opportunity :-)

Abstract: "Assessment practice is at its most rich when assessment events are relevant, authentic and timely. Relevant assessment is that which is inextricably linked to learning outcomes designed to meet an agreed graduate profile (Biggs, 1999). Authentic assessment requires students to perform real-world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential skills and knowledge. Timely assessment provides students with the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge gained as they learn. Teaching and learning in a blended format enables relevant, authentic and timely assessment that is greatly facilitated by the use of online tools, including self-grading, simulation and problem-based approaches, activities that require reflection and peer-review and the electronic delivery of assessment tasks. Drawing on Bloom’s extended taxonomy of cognitive development (Anderson, Krathwohl, & Bloom, 2001) and sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1934) this paper will demonstrate the value of designing and using e-assessments to enhance student learning. Examples will be explored that illustrate some of the benefits to teaching and learning offered by moving toward assessments based in flexible, mobile, collaborative learning technologies."

Please cite as: Owen, H., & Martin, H. (2008 , November 17-19). Using online tools to provide relevant, authentic and timely assessment. Paper presented at the Symposium on Tertiary Assessment and Higher Education Student Outcomes: Policy, Practice, and Research, Rutherford House, Wellington, New Zealand.


Symposium on Tertiary Assessment and Higher Education, Victoria University, Wellington - 17 Nov 2008

The conference was held at Rutherford House, Victoria University and started on a very wet and windy day in Wellington. I met with Helen, Bettina, Ed, and Colin and we 'walked' across the venue being buffeted all the way. Having arrived we chatted with a few people, and I recognised a couple of people from EIT which was good. After registering we were then delighted to find out that there is Internet access - hurrah, and even better the login works with the wireless network as well.

Because I was busy socialising on Sunday night with colleagues, I did not have time to swot up on our presentation for Monday, but looking through it this morning I feel fine - I think it will go well. It's going to be a wee bit tight on the time, given the number of slides, but I do feel as though we have something valuable to add. Once we arrived at the venue, I went to find where Helen and I are presenting and figured out where I will be able to plug my laptop in, and how to get things sorted out, so I feel a little more confident about the presentation.

After the welcome Kerry Shephard (just over from the UK - Uni of Southampton where he was ed tech learning and teaching manager) presented. He brought to the fore some of the central aspects of assessment, raising questions and starting points for discussions for the rest of the symposium. It was also suggested that research led teaching was the goal that should be aimed for and, in fact what is currently the form in NZ and Australia. It was suggested that the two mesh together, and we do not have to be equally in expert in each, but can certainly research what we are doing and publish the results. Another aspect that was under discussion in several of the session was the focus on performance rather than just giving grades.

It has been a valuable conference with a range of important areas covered in particular the increasing use of peer-review and peer-assessment/feedback, self-reflection, and the importance of using well-written rubrics. Also key themes was the use of online assessment, and the incorporation of cultural factors into assessment.




Thursday, November 6, 2008

Academic Professional Development and Web 2.0

I was doing some research around the subject of professional development (PD) in academia, with especial reference to ICT enhanced learning and teaching and came across: "Out of Isolation Circles:Web 2.0 for Teacher Professional Development" by Hala Fawzi (http://englishonlinects.blogspot.com/ - who is based in Khartoum, Sudan). The slideshow looks at the various meanings and aspects of PD and Web 2.0, and then explores ways of forming communities of inquiry that enable the sharing of experiences, ideas, and expertise globally.




Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Setting up a PBWiki site

This is a 'how to video' that shows you how to set up a PBwiki site. It has been developed for Unitec New Zealand, but is relevant for anyone who would like to set up a PBWiki site (www.pbwiki.com).

Karen Haines talks about using podcasting for ESL/EFL learners

Karen Haines (School of Language Studies, Unitec NZ) talks about her experiences of using podcasts with ESL students, and the feedback she received from the students.

Jan Bambury talks about the five steps to ICT enhanced learning and teaching "enlightenment"

Jan Bambury (School of Language Studies, Unitec NZ) takes a lighthearted look at the steps of ICT enhanced learning and teaching 'enlightenment' and reflects on her experiences with particular reference to teaching in China.

Howard Norton talks about using ICT to enhance learning in China, in particular Hot Potatoes quizzes

Howard Norton from the School of Language Studies (Unitec New Zealand) talks about using ICT to enhance learning in China, in particular Hot Potatoes quizzes.

Why use Smartboards with ESL / EFL students?

Lisa Simperingham reflects on what inspired her to use smarboards with students and some of the challenges and rewards she encountered.

Smartboard Traning Session with Lisa Simperingham and Grete Larson

These are short extracts from a Smartboard training session that Lisa Simperingham and Grete Larsen ran in the School of Language Studies at Unitec New Zealand (May 2008). The video shows basic functions such as how to move the tool bar down, move text, and write on the Smartboard. (The sound quality is not very good...).

How to set up and customise your a Flickr account

This is a 'how to video' that shows you how to set up and customise your own Flickr account. It has been developed for Unitec New Zealand, but is relevant for anyone who would like to set up a Flickr photostream.

How to use Wimba Course Genie

This is a 'how to video' that shows you how to use the basic features of Wimba Course Genie to generate your own Web site from an MSWord document. It has been developed for Unitec New Zealand, but is relevant for anyone who would like to use Wimba Course Genie.

Monday, November 3, 2008

Policy in Practice: A Blended Learning Approach to ELT

This is the audio of a presentation that Emma Durham and I gave at the Thai TESOL Conference in Khon Kaen, Thailand, January 2008. If you would like to access the slideshow: http://www.slideshare.net/hazelowendmc/slideshows Please cite as: Owen, H., & Durham, E. (2008, January 24-26). Policy in Practice: A Blended Learning Approach to ELT. Paper presented at the English Language Teaching: Progress in Practice and Policy Conference, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Breaking down the barriers and celebrating diversity: A collaborative Wiki-based writing project

This is the audio from the presentation that Clayton Young and I gave at the LED conference at the university of Waikato in New Zealand, November 2007. Please cite as: Owen, H., & Young, C. (2007, November 21-24). Breaking down the barriers and celebrating diversity: A collaborative Wiki-based writing project. Paper presented at the Language, Education and Diversity Conference, The University of Waikato, Hamilton.

Basic conventions for compare and contrast essays (tertiary Foundation level)

This video covers, step-by-step, the basic conventions of writing a compare and contrast essay. It was produced for Dubai Men's College students, but is suitable for any Foundation level, tertiary students looking for a starting point.

How to reference personal interviews using Noodlebib

Not sure how to reference personal interviews? This video shows you, step-by-step, how to reference using the online tool, Noodlebib (which produces MLA style reference lists). The video was produced for Foundation students at Dubai Men's College, but may offer you a starting point.

How to use Noodlebib

Noodlebib is a referencing tool from Noodletools (http://www.noodletools.com/). This video covers how to set up an account, and basic functionality of the tool. It was designed and developed for students in Foundations at Dubai Men's College, but you may find it useful if you wish to use Noodlebib.

Writing an advantages and disadvantages essay (Tertiary - Foundation level)

If you are unsure where to start when writing an advantages and disadvantages essay, you may find this video useful. The video covers how to start, what to include, and the type of language you might use. Developed for English as second language speakers at Dubai Men's College, this video may be useful if English is not your first language.

Friday, October 31, 2008

Ideas to begin accessing a technical text...

Nick Marsden from Unitec New Zealand ran a training session in June 2008 with the UATI School to discuss ideas that would help students access the technical texts required as part of their vocational courses.

Reading and referencing technical text books the easy way

Don't know where to start when faced with a technical text book? Not sure how to reference information from a textbook? This vodcast may be of help to you.

How to set up a Vox Account

This was a video developed for the School of Natural Sciences at Unitec NZ, but it shows the basics of how to set up and edit a Vox blog account.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Web 2.0 in a nutshell...

I was busily backing up my Moodle courses today prior to an upgrade, and found amongst one of the courses that I opened by accident, a rather inspiring video (thanks to Giedre and Thom). It is a thought-provoking snap shot of Web 2.0 that considers the social and cultural implications of digital text, social linking, collaborative creation and more. Really nicely put together, it is an engaging introduction to Web 2.0.




Monday, October 13, 2008

Learning, Teaching and Web 2.0 (Mark van Hamerlen)

Learning, teaching and Web 2.0

From: markvanharmelen, 2 years ago




Mark van Harmelen discusses some experience and issues pertaining to the current and future use of Web 2.0 in learning and teaching.

SlideShare Link

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Presentation at MoodleMoot Conference October 11, 2008

Where do I Start? Integration of ICTELT into blended curricula

From: hazelowendmc, 6 minutes ago




Abstract:"The potential of information communication technology (ICT) to enhance learning is under-utilised even though there are numerous process models and frameworks have been developed to assist in the design and / or adaptation of curricula. Issues with many existing design models are complex and range from the pragmatic, such as resource requirements, skills and ‘ownership’ of a project, to models being mechanical, inflexible, hierarchical and / or impenetrable.

This session starts by exploring the learning and teaching value ICT can add to curricula, and then describes a process model and framework that I have adapted from existing examples. The accessible, scaffolded approach described is appropriate for very small teams or individuals working with few resources to develop resources ideal for instructors interested in blended learning and/or distance approaches.

The pedagogical underpinnings of a design process are outlined, in which practitioners identify a teaching and learning problem and assess whether ICT could enhance learners’ experience of new or existing programmes, modules, units, sessions, or learning objects. Guiding questions are posed to help support the process, and an iterative practice is encouraged whereby a design is developed, piloted, evaluated, revisited, modified and re-evaluated over time, with recognition that the practitioner’s experience, skills and attitudes are likely to shift.

The practical application of the model and framework is illustrated through an example developed for use in Moodle at UnitecNZ.

The model and framework have yet to be piloted and MoodleMoot will offer a hands-on opportunity for participants to experiment and evaluate the tools in this session by identifying a resource or session that they would like to adapt. Then, working collaboratively, in Moodle they will work through the first part of the process model by completing the framework. Feedback and comments will be gladly accepted."

Associated site: http://efest2008collaboratingbydesign.pbwiki.com/

Owen, H. (2008, October 8-10). Where do I Start? Integration of ICTELT into blended curricula. Paper presented at the MoodleMoot NZ 08, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand.


SlideShare Link

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Increasing student success through effective literacy and numeracy support





Abstract: "The success of students is of central concern for tertiary institutions globally and in New Zealand. When learners are unable to meet the literacy and numeracy demands of their programmes, they struggle to achieve the learning outcomes necessary to graduate, and tend not to reach full potential in their community.
To improve the quality of teaching and learning at Unitec NZ, staff is beginning to employ an integrated approach to teaching courses, thereby assisting students with literacy and numeracy challenges. Professional development is essential to engage staff in the process of refocussing and revisioning the experience offered to learners.

The Centre for Teaching and Learning Innovation (CTLI) is working closely with staff to design and provide contextualised workshops in direct response to needs identified by each school for their specific learners. This paper describes one such initiative for Automotive Engineering staff, where a range of literacy and numeracy related tools were showcased in two collaborative and interactive workshops. Eleven literacy and numeracy support tools, sourced from a variety of places, were chosen to exemplify best practice. The presenters will give an overview of the workshops and the thinking/theory behind them (including the iterative cycle of evaluation and improvement of the workshops in response to participant feedback). A demonstration of key workstations with the associated handouts / interactive tasks will be available for trial by conference participants who will also be asked to evaluate each tool/workstation in a feedback form."

Please cite as: Please cite as: Owen, H, & Schwenger, B. (2008). Student Success; Increasing student success through effective literacy and numeracy support. Paper presented at the EIT Teaching and Learning Conference, 2008, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand.


SlideShare Link

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Noel on Blogging

This week I went to watch a presentation by Noel ((a third year BDesign student), who was talking about his blog and the experiences he had had using it. After chatting with us for a few minutes, and mentioning how nervous he was he proceeded to confidently showcase his blog to a lecture theatre with about 30 first year students in it. It was superb - he covered how, with Vox, different levels of security could be assigned to each post, how feedback from peers and lecturers was rapid and could be done anywhere, and how each step of a project could be shown in his blog. He also mentioned more in depth discussions, group work, summaries, and even demonstrated how he could take a picture with his mobile phone and upload it there and then. The only downside was the time that blogging took if it was to be done well - but maybe when offset against more traditional ways of project-building, it might not be such a great investment in time, it just seems that way as it is done nearly every day. This is an awesome resource for folk who are trying to persuade faculty why blogs are a good way to go. Many thanks to Noel (and to Thom Cochrane for posting the footage :-)



Friday, September 19, 2008

Introducing Hazel Owen, CTLI, Unitec New Zealand

This is a short video that introduces Hazel Owen, her current role as an academic advisor (education technology consultant) at the Centre for Teaching and Learning Innovation, Untiec NZ, and a little bit about her background.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Programme design for learning



This video features a paper entitled "Programme design that puts the 'me' back into learning experiences and spaces" that was presented by Hazel Owen. It was give virtually at the DEANZ 2008 conference "My Place, My Space, My Learning" - Distance and Virtual Education Sunday 17th August - Wednesday 20th August, 2008 Te Papa Tongarewa, Museum of New Zealand, Wellington (http://www.deanz.org.nz/conf2008).

The abstract: "A key objective of tertiary education is to foster fundamental shifts in learners understanding of what learning and thinking comprises, and the role they perform. Learning theorists stress the requirement that students are involved in process-based, experiential activities. The design of curricula and courses must therefore encourage engagement with tasks, peers, teachers and the community. This paper outlines a forty-week Computer, Research Skills and Projects (CRSP) course developed for Foundation students at Dubai Mens College (DMC) using a blended learning approach underpinned by socio-cultural principles and an Activity Theory (AT) framework, and reports briefly on the associated research study."

Please cite appropriately :-) - thanks.

Monday, September 15, 2008

M-Learning: Learning on the go

This is a short presentation on m-learning for Perth's BarCamp. Sue Waters illustrates the differences in how VET and Universities use m-learning in Australia.
From: dswaters, 2 years ago

m-Learning: Learning on the go
View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: sue tafe)

SlideShare Link

Friday, September 12, 2008

Collaborating by Design


This is a 'virtual' paper presentation that I gave at EFest 2008 conference in September and it is in video format with a copy of the Elluminate session question and answer session that followed.

The abstract: "The potential of information, communication technology enhanced learning and teaching (ICTELT) is under-utilised even though numerous process models and frameworks are available. Barriers to using many existing models include resource expectations, experience, skills requirements and ownership of a project.

This paper outlines a process model and framework, adapted from earlier examples, developed to help answer the question Where do I start? for practitioners who are unfamiliar with adapting education resources to make effective use of ICTELT. Employing a scaffolded approach appropriate for working in small teams, or as individuals, the guiding questions form the foundation for collaborative discussion of design choices, ICT tool selection, and the incorporation of a range of pedagogical approaches with a variety of tools. The model and framework can be used with new and/or existing programmes, modules, units, sessions, or learning objects, but initially practitioners are encouraged to trial the process on a small scale.

Practical application of the tools is demonstrated by working through an example that was the basis of a research project at Dubai Mens College. The model and framework have not yet been piloted in NZ, and this EFest session offers a collaborative, hands-on opportunity for participants to experiment and evaluate them."

Please cite as:
Owen, H. (2008, September 8-10). Collaborating by Design. Paper presented at the eFest 2008 - Connected Learning Conference, Auckland, NZ.

The value of using CALL with tertiary students studying ESL: Attitudes and implications


An article that looks into the efficacy of using ICT with ESL learners at Unitec New Zealand.

Please cite as: Owen, H. (2003). The value of using CALL with tertiary students studying ESL: Attitudes and implications. In B. Morrison, C. Green & G. Motteram (Eds.), Directions in CALL: Experience, experiments and evaluation (pp. 33-50). Hong Kong: The English Language Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.


Article: Socio-cultural theory Interpretive framework for Computer Assisted Language Learning


Here is an article that you may find interesting if you are working with ESL or EFL students.

Please cite as: Owen, H. (2005). Sociocultural theory: An interpretative framework for computer assisted language learning? In J.-B. Son & S. O'Neill (Eds.), Enhancing learning and teaching: Pedagogy, technology and language (pp. 195-214). Flaxton, Australia: Post Pressed.